The Dei Mercanti street starts from San Paolo all'Orto Square, it crosses the Calafati, Orafi and Battichiodi alleys and ends in the Borgo. The busy shops and bustling markets that are still held here today echo the hubbub of the times in which Pisa was a Republic. In the past, dwellers could buy silk and spices, while craftsmen, goldsmiths, painters and sword-makers toiled around their workshops. Centuries later, this street still offers an array of shops, ranging from computer stores to fashion boutiques, and if you're feeling peckish, you can always stop to savour some typical local dishes surrounded by a historical and refined setting.

The street is named after one of the Guilds which were active in Pisa in the Middle Ages, the Guild of Merchants, which was one of many associations, such as the Guild of the Sea, the Guild of Wool and the Guild of the Seven Arts.

From the 11th to the 13th century, Pisan merchants traded all over the Mediterranean to North Africa, through the Middle East and Asia along the Silk Road. In 1162 an Imperial Diploma granted Pisa full authority on the Tyrrhenian coast, from Portovenere to Civitavecchia, giving it access to all the southern Italian cities.

The street links San Paolo all'Orto with Borgo. In the Dei Mercanti street you can see the old tower-houses, whose height was regulated by law with the Lodo delle Torri (1088-1092). One of the oldest examples of urban regulation, the law aimed to avoid competition among rich families and it set the maximum height for towers at 22 metres.

On the corner with the Borgo stands the house of renowned musician Vincenzo Galilei, Galileo Galilei's father.

Invia ad un amico Stampa Edited by (Comune di Pisa)
Last update 27/01/2014
Walking in the City

Dei Mercanti Street

The Dei Mercanti street starts from San Paolo all'Orto Square, it crosses the Calafati, Orafi and Battichiodi alleys and ends in the Borgo. The busy shops and bustling markets that are still held here today echo the hubbub of the times in which Pisa was a Republic. In the past, dwellers could buy silk and spices, while craftsmen, goldsmiths, painters and sword-makers toiled around their workshops. Centuries later, this street still offers an array of shops, ranging from computer stores to fashion boutiques, and if you're feeling peckish, you can always stop to savour some typical local dishes surrounded by a historical and refined setting.

The street is named after one of the Guilds which were active in Pisa in the Middle Ages, the Guild of Merchants, which was one of many associations, such as the Guild of the Sea, the Guild of Wool and the Guild of the Seven Arts.

From the 11th to the 13th century, Pisan merchants traded all over the Mediterranean to North Africa, through the Middle East and Asia along the Silk Road. In 1162 an Imperial Diploma granted Pisa full authority on the Tyrrhenian coast, from Portovenere to Civitavecchia, giving it access to all the southern Italian cities.

The street links San Paolo all'Orto with Borgo. In the Dei Mercanti street you can see the old tower-houses, whose height was regulated by law with the Lodo delle Torri (1088-1092). One of the oldest examples of urban regulation, the law aimed to avoid competition among rich families and it set the maximum height for towers at 22 metres.

On the corner with the Borgo stands the house of renowned musician Vincenzo Galilei, Galileo Galilei's father.


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