These two streets represent -together with Corso Italia and the array of shops that they offer- the soul of the southern riverbank. Here you will find wine-sellers, boutiques, bakers, bars, sportswear shops, hairdressers, florists, estate agents, goldsmiths, tattoo-making shops, and so on; in a word, two streets that offer you a nice alternative way of shopping.

All these businesses are heirs to the commercial history of this district, once known as Chinzica. During the XI century, a cosmopolitan population devoted to trades with the Pisan Port lived here.

In 1155, this district was incorporated to the ancient part of Pisa and several Pisan families built here their palaces and tower-houses, writing down a lasting over the centuries history. From the 11th to the 14th century, Chinzica was home to merchants, craftsmen, fur traders, druggists, goldsmiths, tailors, shoemakers, barbers, stationers, wine-sellers.

In former times, Corso Italia and its elegant old palaces, were known as Carraia Sant’ Egidio or San Giulio, named after the Medieval door located near the Square of Vittorio Emanuele the 2nd.

Intersecting Cottolengo street was the church of San Giulio, while the church of San Domenico (1382) where blessed Chiara Gambacorti set up the first Dominican community can be still admired.

In 1862,Corso Italia became the hub of Pisan trades, thanks to the construction of the railway station.

Not far from Cottolengo street are the Domus Mazziniana, the Church of Sant’Antonio, the Medieval walls and the Mural Tuttomondo.

Invia ad un amico Stampa Edited by (Comune di Pisa)
Last update 27/01/2014
Walking in the City

Cottolengo street and Pascoli Street

These two streets represent -together with Corso Italia and the array of shops that they offer- the soul of the southern riverbank. Here you will find wine-sellers, boutiques, bakers, bars, sportswear shops, hairdressers, florists, estate agents, goldsmiths, tattoo-making shops, and so on; in a word, two streets that offer you a nice alternative way of shopping.

All these businesses are heirs to the commercial history of this district, once known as Chinzica. During the XI century, a cosmopolitan population devoted to trades with the Pisan Port lived here.

In 1155, this district was incorporated to the ancient part of Pisa and several Pisan families built here their palaces and tower-houses, writing down a lasting over the centuries history. From the 11th to the 14th century, Chinzica was home to merchants, craftsmen, fur traders, druggists, goldsmiths, tailors, shoemakers, barbers, stationers, wine-sellers.

In former times, Corso Italia and its elegant old palaces, were known as Carraia Sant’ Egidio or San Giulio, named after the Medieval door located near the Square of Vittorio Emanuele the 2nd.

Intersecting Cottolengo street was the church of San Giulio, while the church of San Domenico (1382) where blessed Chiara Gambacorti set up the first Dominican community can be still admired.

In 1862,Corso Italia became the hub of Pisan trades, thanks to the construction of the railway station.

Not far from Cottolengo street are the Domus Mazziniana, the Church of Sant’Antonio, the Medieval walls and the Mural Tuttomondo.


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